training

New for the 2016 Season: Long Term Player Development (LTPD)

Information provided/written by Alex Chiet, Technical Director for the Ontario Soccer Association (OSA)

What is LTPD?

In short, LTPD is very simple. It is a thoroughly researched, tested, proven, and overwhelmingly well-received approach to working with young athletes in soccer-rich countries around the world.

Whether a youngster is in soccer to simply stay active and fit or aspires to play at very competitive levels, LTPD is geared to developing youngsters in an environment that is stimulating, enriching—and fun.

The basic premise is this: at the younger ages (4 through 12) we will focus, incrementally, on physical literacy, touches on the ball, skill development and eventually, training to “compete”. The objective is to help every player develop to his or her true potential, at whatever level they want to play. We can achieve this through improved coaching methods along with superior training and development programs that we will start to introduce in 2013.

What will you notice, as parents?

At the earliest ages, you will see a real emphasis on movement, coordination and athleticism. This will lead into skill development, ball work and the many skills required to play - and fully enjoy - the great sport of soccer.

 

U4/U5
No games - academy style, 45 minutes once per week
(Coaches: Active Start + Making Ethical Decision and Respect in Soccer)
U6
6 players per team (3 vs. 3), no goal keeper, one 45 min. practice per week and one game per week consisting of two 15 min. halves. No pass ins, kick in only. Pug nets or 5’ x 8’ goals. No Referee.
(Coaches: Fundamentals + Making Ethical Decision and Respect in Soccer)
U7/U8
10 players per team (5 vs. 5) including goal keeper, one 45 min. practice per week and one game per week consisting of two 15 min. halves. No pass ins, kick in only. 5’x 8’ goal. With Referee.
(Coaches: Fundamentals + Making Ethical Decisions and Respect in Soccer)
U9/U10
 12 players per team (7 vs. 7) including goal keeper, one 60 min. practice per week and one game per week consisting of two 25 min. halves. No pass ins, 6’x16’ goal. With Referee.
(Coaches: Learning to Train + Making Ethical Decisions and Respect in Soccer)
U11/U12
16 players per team (9 vs. 9) including goal keeper, one 60 min. practice per week and one game per week consisting of two 35 min. halves. Pass ins ok, 6’x18’ goal. With Referee. No standings
(Coaches: Learning to Train + Making Ethical Decisions and Respect in Soccer)

 

Skills Development

You will notice an emphasis on training, more practice time and individual skills development and much less on games and “winning” and “losing”. We realize this will require a bit of a shift in attitude for many of us, but we have studied what soccer-countries are doing, and this approach has clearly worked. We need to move in this direction.

Competition and education

        • Will your sons and daughters stop playing games and stop competing? Not at all. But again, the emphasis will be different
           going forward. We are working on re-shaping the structure of our leagues to maintain competition and create a healthier
           model for all.
        • This is very much about education—better education, training and preparation for our youth coaches, who in turn will
           provide an improved environment for players at every age and stage of development.
        • Recreational players will enjoy the game much more than before. Importantly, they will also learn more and because they
           are learning and enjoying their experience, will want to stay active in the sport. Elite players will benefit, because the new
           player pathway we are developing will ensure that, wherever your son or daughter plays in the province, they will have the
           opportunity to be seen, identified and recommended for more intensive training at a regional and ultimately “provincial”
           level of play.


Read all about the latest news on this program from the Ontario Soccer Association (OSA) right here. The Development Matrix details the Standards for 2014 and beyond and all the information contained within the matrix is in alignment with the "CSA Wellness to World Cup Documents" which outlines LTPD implementation in Canada. 


Other Related Articles:
 - Canada's David Edgar applaud no-score soccer for kids
 - Keeping score on the soccer field and in the class
 - Ontario Youth Soccer to stop keeping score standings
 

Junior Development Program (JDP)